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Welding

Advances in welding technology continue to create efficiencies for the businesses who adopt them. Applying best practices help ensure weld quality and efficiency.

Axxair Orbital System Makes Welding Small Pipes Easy

18 October, 18 3:12 pm · Leave a comment · reddarc
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multi pipe welded array
Welding small diameter tubing can be difficult.  The tight radii often require expert welders to deliver precise torch manipulation with finesse.  If the welder is not skilled enough, the out of position areas are at risk of poor quality due to gravity affecting the weld pool and ineffective torch angles.  If out of position welds cannot be completed satisfactorily, the part must be rotated.  However, some assemblies can’t be rotated because of size constraints or they might rotate off of center.  If a mechanized welding solution is desired for small diameter components, look no further than our Axxair Orbital Fusion Closed Welding Head Systems.


Closed-Head Pipe Welders

Axxair Orbital Fusion Closed Welding Systems are comprised of two main parts: the
Axxair Orbital Fusion Closed Welding Head
and the Axxair Orbital Inverter Power Supply.  The Orbital Fusion Closed Welding Head fully encompasses the assembly being welded.  This means that an inert gas environment can be created around the part, preventing it from the risk of oxidation that it might be exposed to during a welding operation that relies solely on a gas nozzle.  The Orbital Fusion Closed Welding Head also has a ring drive that enables full 360 degree motion around the weld joint, all the while keeping a consistent torch angle.  Furthermore, it is capable of going over 360 degrees for when slope-in and slope-out parameters are needed.
Closed Welding Heads

“The Orbital Fusion Closed Welding Head also has a ring drive that enables full 360 degree motion around the weld joint, all the while keeping a consistent torch angle.”

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What Do American Welding Society Wire Filler Metal Designations Mean?

07 September, 18 2:58 pm · Leave a comment · reddarc
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Selecting Welding Wire

coil of welding wire
When selecting a wire electrode for welding, one will most likely run into an American Welding Society (AWS) filler metal classification. A purchaser who isn’t familiar with the AWS classification system might select the wrong type of wire. If the purchaser is only familiar with gas metal arc welding (GMAW) wire and is attempting to purchase self-shielded flux-cored wire (FCAW-S), confusion may arise about the differences between the two classifications. This too could result in selecting the wrong wire electrode. To help prevent this from happening, we’ve created this welding wire reference guide to remind welders exactly what the different AWS classifications designations mean. We’ve included references for solid wire electrodes, metal-cored wire electrodes, gas-shielded flux-cored electrodes, and self-shielded flux-cored electrodes.

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Strengthening Metal Parts with Hardfacing

27 April, 18 2:42 pm · Leave a comment · reddarc
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Metallic parts sometimes fail their intended use at a lower stress than they are designated for.
Various forms of wear such as abrasion, impact, metal to metal contact, heat, and corrosion can compromise the strength of metal pieces. This is where hardfacing comes in. Hardfacing is a technique which can be applied to minimize the damage from these types of wear, helping to prolong the life of metal pieces.

What is hardfacing?

Hardfacing —often called hardsurfacing— is the covering of the metallic part with a wear resistant metal by welding. Alloys which commonly need to be hardfaced include carbon alloy and low alloy steels whose carbon content is lower than 1 %. These include stainless steels, manganese steels, cast iron as well as nickel and copper-based alloys.

Metallic parts sometimes fail their intended use at a lower stress than they are designated for.

Techniques, Materials and Costs

The particular hardfacing technique for a job depends on the geometry of the part and relative cost of the hardfacing method. Costs can vary with the deposition rate of the material.

These cost variations can be summarized as follows:

  • Flux cored arc welding (FCAW) 8 to 25 lb/hr
  • Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) 3 to 5 lb/hr
  • Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), including both gas-shielded and open arc welding 5 to 12 lb/hr
  • Oxyfuel Welding (OFW) 5 to 10 lb/hr

 

Applied materials commonly include cobalt based alloys such as STELITE, and nickel based materials like chromium carbide alloys. More advanced materials such as complex carbides containing columbium, molybdenum, tungsten, or vanadium can also be used and provide more overall abrasion resistance. They also have a very low friction factor, which can be used in situations involving severe abrasion.

Hardfacing can be applied to both newly manufactured pieces, in order to prevent deterioration, or to strengthen and extend the life of worn pieces currently in use.

Red-D-Arc provides welding machines suitable for hardfacing using techniques including SMAW, FCAW and GMAW.

Is Gas Welding Really Cheaper?

13 April, 18 4:54 pm · Leave a comment · reddarc
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Oxy acetylene welding torch

The answer is often no, and here’s why…

Gas (oxy-acetylene) welders used to be the rock stars of welding. From shipbuilding to automotive manufacturing to steel forging, but that was then. Arc welding is a modern welding method that outmatches gas welding in almost every respect.

Weld finishing:

Arc welders use electric current generated by a transformer or a generator to produce a uniform, clean welds that almost never require finishing. This is not the case with gas welding. Gas welding operates using the heat generated by the ignition of a gas mixture (oxygen and acetylene) to melt the welding material or to simply fuse two parts together. This process often results in a bad surface finish. Gas welding can require additional work involving hours of grinding and polishing the welds.
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The Importance of Welding Surface Preparation

28 March, 18 2:08 pm · Leave a comment · reddarc
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By guest blogger David H.

welding surface preparationHaving worked in shipyards for seven years, I’m familiar with how dirty this type of job site can be. Ship repair worksites and welding surfaces are often filthy with rust, dust and other contaminants. Even in shops and yards where fabrication is ongoing, cleanliness is often lacking. If fabricated or refurbished pieces are being installed onboard, the surface to which the piece will be welded could be rusty, coated with scale, or have other types of corrosion.
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AirGas Logo

Airgas, an Air Liquide company, is the nation's leading single-source supplier of gases, welding and safety products. Known locally nationwide, our distribution network serves more than one million customers of all sizes with a broad offering of top-quality products and unmatched expertise.